Work description

A few years ago I accidentally stumbled upon the steep Mt. Jin Minzi. In a time of globalization and cyber network, I was repetitively and ironically fighting against prickly vines, thorns, blood-sucking ants, mosquitoes, eerie giant taro clusters, sneaky snakes, and other imaginary demons. At the same time, nature also healed me. Ever since that incident, I have become a zealous refugee, and have embarked on countless journeys into the deep mountains. I began a historical survey, which took me along the Frontier Guard Line from the mountainous areas in Xindian to Taoyuan, which was once powered by electric circuits, and I also explored the remaining site of the once popular “Forest Amusement Park” in the 80s; the decaying ruins of the coal industry that ended in the 90s because of terms with the World Trade Organization (WTO); and the countless industrial roads that have been abandoned in the mountains.
Work description

A few years ago I accidentally stumbled upon the steep Mt. Jin Minzi. In a time of globalization and cyber network, I was repetitively and ironically fighting against prickly vines, thorns, blood-sucking ants, mosquitoes, eerie giant taro clusters, sneaky snakes, and other imaginary demons. At the same time, nature also healed me. Ever since that incident, I have become a zealous refugee, and have embarked on countless journeys into the deep mountains. I began a historical survey, which took me along the Frontier Guard Line from the mountainous areas in Xindian to Taoyuan, which was once powered by electric circuits, and I also explored the remaining site of the once popular “Forest Amusement Park” in the 80s; the decaying ruins of the coal industry that ended in the 90s because of terms with the World Trade Organization (WTO); and the countless industrial roads that have been abandoned in the mountains.
I crossed over forgotten graveyards and neglected betel nut groves, and studied the history of these mountainous regions. During the process of the research, I came across some photos of the Liugui Village in Kaohsiung City taken by John Thomson in 1871. The photos had me mesmerized. Thomson was amongst one of the first photographers to travel to Taiwan, and I find it difficult not to feel a sense of “hunting” projected from his photographs. The images have a natural and anthropological “objective” to them. The establishment for this approach to viewing is undoubtedly to embed in the images certain social struggles that we are unaware of. Furthermore, the images could be considered as presented through a "modern capitalistic" approach.
Seeing these images as a form of “modern capitalism”, the thought motivated me to alter them. First of all, I began by enlarging the photographs, and secondly, I followed by relocating the exhibition space to an abandoned area. Moreover, the images are depicted with charcoal. This process alters the very essence of these images.


I crossed over forgotten graveyards and neglected betel nut groves, and studied the history of these mountainous regions. During the process of the research, I came across some photos of the Liugui Village in Kaohsiung City taken by John Thomson in 1871. The photos had me mesmerized. Thomson was amongst one of the first photographers to travel to Taiwan, and I find it difficult not to feel a sense of “hunting” projected from his photographs. The images have a natural and anthropological “objective” to them. The establishment for this approach to viewing is undoubtedly to embed in the images certain social struggles that we are unaware of. Furthermore, the images could be considered as presented through a "modern capitalistic" approach.
Seeing these images as a form of “modern capitalism”, the thought motivated me to alter them. First of all, I began by enlarging the photographs, and secondly, I followed by relocating the exhibition space to an abandoned area. Moreover, the images are depicted with charcoal. This process alters the very essence of these images.
First of all, by enlarging the photographs, they would take on more “image-like” qualities, and secondly, by placing the exhibition space in an abandoned area, the images would garner the potential to become backdrops and would thus take on more empty film set or theater-like qualities. Thirdly, through the representation (or transformation) with charcoal sketches, the images would take on more drawing-like qualities. The dialectical relationship of images between me and Thomson is thereby expanded, with thoughts of “historical fragments” incited, as the actual ruins and images are all modern fragments of history. Also, images that are considered to be historical fragments are reproduced in a ruin site, which is also considered to be a form of historical fragment as well. In addition, the process is referred to as a “showcase”; a showcase of modernity with ruins that have been perpetually neglected and eternally exploited.


First of all, by enlarging the photographs, they would take on more “image-like” qualities, and secondly, by placing the exhibition space in an abandoned area, the images would garner the potential to become backdrops and would thus take on more empty film set or theater-like qualities. Thirdly, through the representation (or transformation) with charcoal sketches, the images would take on more drawing-like qualities. The dialectical relationship of images between me and Thomson is thereby expanded, with thoughts of “historical fragments” incited, as the actual ruins and images are all modern fragments of history. Also, images that are considered to be historical fragments are reproduced in a ruin site, which is also considered to be a form of historical fragment as well. In addition, the process is referred to as a “showcase”; a showcase of modernity with ruins that have been perpetually neglected and eternally exploited.
KAO Jun-Honn + Friends of The Ruin Image Crystal Project, The Ruin Image Crystal Project: 10 Scenes—All Get Down, Tsung-Yeh, 2013.

KAO Jun-Honn + Friends of The Ruin Image Crystal Project, The Ruin Image Crystal Project: 10 Scenes—All Get Down, Tsung-Yeh, 2013.
KAO Jun-Honn + Friends of The Ruin Image Crystal Project, The Ruin Image Crystal Project: 10 Scenes—No Man’s Land, Ta-le, 2013.

KAO Jun-Honn + Friends of The Ruin Image Crystal Project, The Ruin Image Crystal Project: 10 Scenes—No Man’s Land, Ta-le, 2013.
KAO Jun-Honn + Friends of The Ruin Image Crystal Project, The Ruin Image Crystal Project: 10 Scenes—Be Able to Solve Education and 
Name Rectification, White Butterfly, 2013.

KAO Jun-Honn + Friends of The Ruin Image Crystal Project, The Ruin Image Crystal Project: 10 Scenes—Be Able to Solve Education and
Name Rectification, White Butterfly, 2013.