Work description

In the series of paintings entitled “Illustration of the Crisis”, it was Natee Utarit’s intention to use the language and grammar of painting of the past. This language relied heavily on metaphors and hidden symbols to communicate. Over the past two or three years, Natee Utarit has felt a renewed fascination for the pictorial language of classical painting. In his search for answers to certain questions, he has had the growing suspicion that the language of contemporary painting, which has been stripped of so much of what mattered to classical painting, is simply not up to the job of conveying the complexity of modern issues and the multifarious nature of “truth” today. “Illustration of the Crisis” series is as simple and straightforward as Natee Utarit feels his paintings ought to be. There is no irony. There are no optical illusions. Everything is meant to tell a story in the same direct manner that characterized paintings for centuries. He has used a number of figurines that suggest meanings suited to the message he is trying to convey.
Work description

In the series of paintings entitled “Illustration of the Crisis”, it was Natee Utarit’s intention to use the language and grammar of painting of the past. This language relied heavily on metaphors and hidden symbols to communicate. Over the past two or three years, Natee Utarit has felt a renewed fascination for the pictorial language of classical painting. In his search for answers to certain questions, he has had the growing suspicion that the language of contemporary painting, which has been stripped of so much of what mattered to classical painting, is simply not up to the job of conveying the complexity of modern issues and the multifarious nature of “truth” today. “Illustration of the Crisis” series is as simple and straightforward as Natee Utarit feels his paintings ought to be. There is no irony. There are no optical illusions. Everything is meant to tell a story in the same direct manner that characterized paintings for centuries. He has used a number of figurines that suggest meanings suited to the message he is trying to convey.
These figures are combined in such a way that it becomes difficult to tell if the resulting atmosphere is realistic or an imaginary dreamscape. Regardless of the context or the society people live in, it has become increasingly hard to distinguish “what’s true” from “what isn’t” because everything is designed to make people think that it’s “real”. 
Natee Utarit’s paintings always feature animals. Just as in literature and other forms of art, these animals are meant to stand in for various human behaviors, thoughts, and emotions. The animals in his paintings are not based on real-life animals. Instead, they are toys or plastic animal figurines. In fact, nothing in his paintings is taken directly from nature, and that includes the parts of the human body. The simple fact that something has been chosen to appear in the painting is reason enough for it be there. Using the building blocks of pictorial grammar, which show signs of confrontation and evaluation, the artist asks questions about the changes which have given rise to the crisis he described above.


These figures are combined in such a way that it becomes difficult to tell if the resulting atmosphere is realistic or an imaginary dreamscape. Regardless of the context or the society people live in, it has become increasingly hard to distinguish “what’s true” from “what isn’t” because everything is designed to make people think that it’s “real”.
Natee Utarit’s paintings always feature animals. Just as in literature and other forms of art, these animals are meant to stand in for various human behaviors, thoughts, and emotions. The animals in his paintings are not based on real-life animals. Instead, they are toys or plastic animal figurines. In fact, nothing in his paintings is taken directly from nature, and that includes the parts of the human body. The simple fact that something has been chosen to appear in the painting is reason enough for it be there. Using the building blocks of pictorial grammar, which show signs of confrontation and evaluation, the artist asks questions about the changes which have given rise to the crisis he described above.
As a painter, he knows very well what painting should and can do within the constraints of its own particular language. His work can only communicate through pictures. In addition, it’s his intention to make use of his experiences and what he knows of the outside world to elucidate the various aspects of meaning contained in his work.


As a painter, he knows very well what painting should and can do within the constraints of its own particular language. His work can only communicate through pictures. In addition, it’s his intention to make use of his experiences and what he knows of the outside world to elucidate the various aspects of meaning contained in his work.
Natee UTARIT, Country, 2011, Oil on Linen, 360x240cm. Private Collection.

Natee UTARIT, Country, 2011, Oil on Linen, 360x240cm. Private Collection.
Natee UTARIT, Dust under the Shoes, 2010, Oil on Linen, 170x190cm. Courtesy of  Nasrat Luca Muzayyin.

Natee UTARIT, Dust under the Shoes, 2010, Oil on Linen, 170x190cm. Courtesy of Nasrat Luca Muzayyin.
Natee UTARIT, The Dawn of Day, 2010, Oil on Linen, 170x200cm. Courtesy of  Nasrat Luca Muzayyin.

Natee UTARIT, The Dawn of Day, 2010, Oil on Linen, 170x200cm. Courtesy of Nasrat Luca Muzayyin.