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Meiro KOIZUMI, Rite for a Dream (Today My Empire Sings), 2016, 3-channel video installation, 27 min 30 sec. Courtesy of the artist and Annet Gelink Gallery (Amsterdam), MUJIN-TO Production (Tokyo). Photo by Shizune Shiigi. Image courtesy of the artist, Annet Gelink Gallery (Amsterdam) and MUJIN-TO Production (Tokyo).
Meiro KOIZUMI, Rite for a Dream (Today My Empire Sings), 2016, 3-channel video installation, 27 min 30 sec. Courtesy of the artist and Annet Gelink Gallery (Amsterdam), MUJIN-TO Production (Tokyo). Photo by Shizune Shiigi. Image courtesy of the artist, Annet Gelink Gallery (Amsterdam) and MUJIN-TO Production (Tokyo).
Meiro KOIZUMI, Rite for a Dream (Today My Empire Sings), 2016, 3-channel video installation, 27 min 30 sec. Courtesy of the artist and Annet Gelink Gallery (Amsterdam), MUJIN-TO Production (Tokyo). Photo by Shizune Shiigi. Image courtesy of the artist, Annet Gelink Gallery (Amsterdam) and MUJIN-TO Production (Tokyo).









Meiro KOIZUMI

In this work, I overlaid a strange dream that I had as a small child with violent images of the current rise of nationalistic sentiment in Japanese society. The work is my close examination of the Japanese Emperor on a very personal level.

The video installation starts with a narrator describing a strange dream. This is a real dream that I had when I was 6 or 7. In this dream, my father was caught and fed to chicken by the police. As the narration goes on, the cityscape of Tokyo appears in the story. Gradually, the narrator finds himself in a chaotic situation. He is pushed by police and exposed to the vulgar violence of nationalists, who are shouting at him to “get out of Japan!”

The scene was shot at the annual anti-Emperor demonstration that takes place every August 15th. In opposition to the anti-Emperor rally of 200 demonstrators, proto-fascist nationalists from all over Japan gathered and tried to stop the demonstration. As many as 2000 police were in charge of controlling the situation. It was one of the biggest collisions between the rightists and the leftists in Japanese history. I use this particular scene to depict my own childhood nightmare, in which my father was caught by the police to be sacrificed for the survival of the community. This echoes the stories of other father-figures, such as Jesus Christ and the Emperor, who are destined to be sacrificed to keep the higher order.

The final performance was shot in front of the Imperial Palace security. I performed it three times and was not stopped once.

Meiro KOIZUMI

Born in 1976, Gunma, Japan.
Lives and works in Yokohama, Japan.


CV