next

NEXT

prev

PREV

ARTISTS


Lawrence ABU HAMDAN, This whole time there were no land mines, 2017, 1:1 video loops on monitors with sound, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Maureen Paley, London.
Lawrence ABU HAMDAN, This whole time there were no land mines, 2017, 1:1 video loops on monitors with sound, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Maureen Paley, London.
Lawrence ABU HAMDAN, This whole time there were no land mines, 2017, 1:1 video loops on monitors with sound, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Maureen Paley, London.
Lawrence ABU HAMDAN, This whole time there were no land mines, 2017, 1:1 video loops on monitors with sound, dimensions variable. Courtesy of the artist and Maureen Paley, London.









Lawrence ABU HAMDAN

The Golan Heights is an area annexed by Israel from Syria since the 1967 war. For 40 years the families and communities living on either side of the ceasefire line have been divided. In the Golan Heights, there is a place called The Shouting Valley, where the topography creates an acoustic leak across the border. The shouts filled this room which were the salutations of the families who regularly gather at “The Shouting Valley” to hear each other’s voices and wave to one another across the otherwise impervious divide. 

The images you see are from the 15th May 2011 when protesters from all over the country gathered on the Syrian side of the shouting valley for the anniversary of the Nakba. Yet unlike the usual gatherings in this valley, this time the voice was not the only thing to cross the border. 150 Palestinian protesters from Syria unexpectedly broke into Israeli territory. For the first time since 1967 the border was breached. Four protesters were later killed by Israeli soldiers yet the majority managed to exercise, even if briefly, their right of return.

This border breach was captured by someone filming on their phone from the Israeli side of the border where in solidarity with the protestors those communities local to the shouting valley gathered. On this recording amongst the loud protest chants of those breaching the border we can just about make out the voices of the families of the shouting valley in the background. However they are not shouting their usual salutations. Like the border itself their voices became overpowered by the noise as they shout at the top of their lungs:

Enough

Enough

Stop

Stop

Hey. Stop

Enough

Enough

Enough

Stop. Enough

Stop. Enough

Enough

There are land mines 

Stop

Stop

There are land mines. Land Mines

Land Mines. Land Mines

Enough

 

This whole time there were no land mines.

Lawrence ABU HAMDAN

Born in 1985, Amman, Jordan. 
Lives and works in Beirut, Lebanon. 


CV